Celebrating Earth-based Spirituality on Pagan Pride Day

“A wee child toddling in a wonder world,
I prefer to their dogma my excursions into the natural gardens
where the voice of the Great Spirit is heard in the twittering of birds,
the rippling of mighty waters, and the sweet breathing of flowers. 
If this is Paganism, then at present, at least, I am a Pagan.”

Zitkala-Sa

secondbestcircleToday I am in Syracuse, New York, to lead “Elemental Yoga” at the annual Central New York Pagan Pride Day festival. My workshop is from 10:00 to 10:45 a.m. Afterwards I get to spend the remainder of the day connecting with and learning from others who, like me, look to nature for their spiritual inspiration.

Pagans are an eclectic group; their diversity makes them interesting and fun. Their practices may be formal and structured or spontaneous and casual. There are numerous subsets under the Pagan umbrella. Pagans may worship deities from classical or tribal mythology, practice shamanism or magick, view futurology, community or ecology as religion, focus on the Divine Feminine, or simply venerate natural phenomena. Most chose their spiritual paths, rather than following the religions of their families.

At today’s festival we’ll be celebrating the upcoming autumn equinox, as well as doing lots of networking and community building. My husband will be manning the Adirondack Earth Lore booth to showcase his amazing woodturning, and I’ll be hanging out there discussing yoga and healthy living with anyone who will listen. We’ll do some drumming. I’ll watch bellydancers. And I’ll be showing folks how to connect with the energies of Earth, Air, Fire and Water with yoga.

In the area? Come on over to Onondaga Lake Park and join the fun!

Why should the last day of spring mean something to you?

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As I’m writing this, Spring 2014 has less than 24 hours left. Most folks are excited for summer to officially start, although, depending on the climate where you live, it may feel like summer already. Here in the Adirondacks, the start of summer was a bit of a shock, because winter-like weather lasted well into spring. We’ve only just turned the heat off at the yoga studio.

Perhaps you, like me, will be celebrating the Summer Solstice this weekend, or maybe a graduation or a wedding. Maybe, if you live in the U.S., you welcome summer on July 4th. However you celebrate, don’t forget to say goodbye to spring.

Before the festivities start, take a few quiet minutes to reflect on the two seasons that have passed. Did you set intentions for this year, or for last season? Have you honored what you’ve accomplished? Is there anything you need to reassess?

I initiated some big changes back when fall gave way to winter. I needed to feel better physically and emotionally. I also needed to look at the directions my career and finances were taking. Heavy stuff.

I’ve been lucky. I have tremendous support from family, friends and my yoga community, and my new family of health coaches at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition. Even with that support, change is difficult. There have been fears to face, reality checks, uncertainties and second guesses. But there is also slow, steady progress.

I could not have made these difficult but necessary changes without all of that support. I will continue to need that support, as I still have a long way to go.

Knowing the value of that support makes me feel very good about my decision to become a Holistic Health Coach. The best way I can honor all of the support I have received is to give that same caring, nurturing support to others. Together we can discover how to change your life to put you on the path to health and happiness.

Why I write 3 pages about anything every morning

Cover of "The Artist's Way: A Spiritual P...

Cover via Amazon

I purchased my copy of Julia Cameron’s book, The Artist’s Way, about 15 years ago. Working my way through the book was an enlightening experience, and the start of many small changes that have, over time, transformed my life.

The tool that I used most consistently, and kept up the longest, was the Morning Pages. From Julia Cameron’s website:

“Morning Pages are three pages of longhand, stream of consciousness writing, done first thing in the morning. *There is no wrong way to do Morning Pages*– they are not high art. They are not even “writing.” They are about anything and everything that crosses your mind– and they are for your eyes only. Morning Pages provoke, clarify, comfort, cajole, prioritize and synchronize the day at hand. Do not over-think Morning Pages: just put three pages of anything on the page…and then do three more pages tomorrow.”

I did my Morning Pages for nearly a year after finishing the book. I have started and stopped a number of times since then. The latest lull lasted a couple of years. Then I started my Health Coach training at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition.

One of the many fabulous things about IIN’s training is all the non-food-related things that support wellness. Early on in the training I was reintroduced to the Morning Pages during an awesome talk by Julia Cameron. (She is a great storyteller.) I dug out the notebook I had been using during the last round and started again.

When my alarm goes off at 5:00 a.m., I am usually already awake. I sit up in bed and grab my notebook, a pen and my book light (so I don’t wake my husband). My brain gets very busy first thing, so I never struggle to think of something to write. It takes approximately 30 minutes to write three pages longhand. By the time I’m done, my mind is much quieter and I can get on my yoga mat focused on my practice.

I have sorted out lots of issues in my Morning Pages and my yoga practice feels much more centered. Try the Morning Pages for a couple of weeks and see where they take you.

I will be including the Morning Pages as part of my 6-month Health Coaching program. Contact me and let me know you’d like to be on the list for a free initial phone consultation during which you can find out how a Health Coach can guide you on the path to wellness.

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